PhD Procedures | Department of History

PhD Procedures

PROCEDURES FOR THE DOCTORATE OF PHILOSOPHY IN HISTORY

I. Acceptance into the Program

A. Applicants are evaluated on their entire academic history; however, before being accepted into the history doctoral program at the University of North Texas, a student should meet the following general requirements by the current departmental admissions deadline:

  1. Score in the 70th percentile or higher on the verbal portion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) AND in the 40th percentile or higher on the quantitative portion OR 4.0 or higher on the analytical/writing portion of the GRE.
  2. Submit an acceptable statement of his/her purpose in seeking the doctorate in history.
  3. Submit an acceptable formal paper (other than a completed thesis) from his/her master's work.
  4. Provide three acceptable letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's post-secondary academic record.
  5. Have a bachelor's degree and 24 hours of undergraduate history credits from an accredited university (6 hours of US history, 6 hours of world history, and 12 hours of upper-level history).
  6. Have successfully completed a master's degree in history with thesis from an accredited university with a minimum GPA of 3.6 on a four-point scale.
  7. Meet all other university requirements.

B. Student's whose application files are incomplete by the department's current application deadline may register as an undeclared major with Toulouse Graduate School and enroll in graduate history courses (with the written permission of the appropriate faculty) while they complete all of the history admission requirements. Such students may transfer up to twelve hours of this history graduate coursework to count towards the completion of his/her history doctoral degree when and if they are admitted to the history doctoral program.

C. The departmental Graduate Committee reviews the application file of each candidate and determines whether that student will be admitted into the Department's history doctoral program.

II. Advising, Choosing a Major Professor, and Picking a Student's Doctoral Committee

A. The Department Graduate Advisor will serve as the general advisor for all Ph.D. students. The Graduate Advisor will assign incoming students a faculty mentor to guide them until the student selects a major professor. The student may ask the faculty mentor or another professor to serve as major professor.

B. Prior to completion of their first nine (9) hours of graduate history coursework, students must meet with the Graduate Advisor to discuss fulfillment of program requirements.

C. After the completion of their first nine (9) hours of graduate history coursework, and no later than their completion of eighteen (18) total hours of graduate history coursework, students should select a major professor (in consultation with the Graduate Advisor) from among the department's current Category 3 graduate faculty (see Appendix A). Note that faculty members have the right to refuse to serve as a major professor--the picking of a major professor must be a mutual decision between student and faculty member.

D. The major professor will serve as chair of the student's committee and director of the student's dissertation. The student will then, in consultation with the Graduate Advisor and major professor, select three additional committee members from among the department's current graduate faculty (or two history faculty and one faculty from the student's approved minor field--see below). The major professor and committee members must match up with the approved designations of comprehensive examination fields in four distinct areas as detailed below. If a committee member is no longer on the faculty at the time of the dissertation defense, the member may remain on the committee but may not serve as major professor. Note that a student must have successfully completed at least one graduate-level course with each committee member (including the major professor) prior to taking his/her comprehensive examinations.

E. The student must meet with the Graduate Program Assistant to complete a degree plan once the committee is set, no later than the completion of a student's first 18 hours of graduate history coursework. The Graduate Advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of Toulouse Graduate School all certify the degree plan.

III. Degree Requirements

A. The doctoral degree (Ph.D.) is offered in four general concentrations: (1) Europe, (2) United States, (3) Military, and (4) Body, Place and Identity. After completing all course work and the language requirement, doctoral students will be examined in four areas of history selected in consultation with their major professor. A minimum of two areas must come from the student's main concentration, and one area must come from one of the three remaining concentrations or the World examination fields. All dissertation and exam areas must conform to the list of fields currently recognized by the Department (see Appendix B).

B. The student must complete:

  1. a minimum of thirty (30) classroom hours of graduate courses in history or an approved minor field (not including language or leveling courses). A minimum of four graduate-level history seminar courses (12 credit hours) in history and 3 hours of historiography are required as part of the 30 hours in the classroom.
  2. twelve (12) dissertation hours (HIST 6950).

C. Once admitted into the Ph.D. program, the student must maintain a minimum 3.6 grade-point average (on a four-point scale) based on all history graduate classes (HIST) and non-history graduate classes that count toward the degree, exclusive of I and PR grades, each semester until the degree is awarded. This includes any courses taken as an undeclared major at UNT and then transferred into the history doctoral program. After completion of 18 graduate credit hours in History, a student's cumulative GPA as defined above will be evaluated at the end of every semester or summer term as applicable. Once this evaluation process begins, if the student's cumulative GPA is less than 3.6 at the end of any given semester or summer term, they are on academic probation with the department. The student will have one semester or summer term to pull their cumulative GPA up to 3.6 or higher. In cases where it is not possible to achieve a cumulative 3.6 GPA with just one probationary semester, the student may appeal to the departmental Graduate Committee (in writing) to extend the probation one additional semester or summer term if the student has made satisfactory progress towards a 3.6 GPA in their initial probationary term. Failure to pull the cumulative GPA up to 3.6 or higher at the end of the complete probationary term OR a subsequent case of the cumulative GPA falling below 3.6 will result in the student's termination from the program. In addition, students will not be allowed to sign up for dissertation hours or schedule their comprehensive exams if their cumulative GPA is under 3.6.

D. Students should complete the language requirement (reading knowledge of one foreign language that has been approved by the student's major professor) as soon as possible after initial enrollment to use foreign-language skills in course work and/or dissertation research. Ph.D. students must fulfill the language requirement before they schedule their comprehensive exams.

E. Existing university regulations concerning completion of the doctoral dissertation also apply.

F. Doctoral students may not enroll in HIST 6950 (Dissertation Hours) until they have successfully passed their written and oral comprehensive exams.

G. A student may, with the permission of the major professor and the Department Chair, take six graduate level hours of coursework from another department at UNT and declare an official minor field. These six hours must include at least one research seminar (3 hours) in a relevant academic department outside of History. In such a case, the minor field will count as one of the four required comprehensive examination fields, with the minor research seminar counting as one of the four required research seminars. The student must also have a minor field committee member (i.e., a faculty member from the outside department in question with whom the student has taken at least one graduate level course as specified on the student's degree plan) who is willing to administer both written and oral comprehensive examinations, participate in the student's dissertation proposal defense, and be a member of the student's dissertation committee.

H. Completion of a specific number of graduate hours does not automatically make the student eligible for a degree. The student must also demonstrate proficiency by:

  1. completion of the language requirement.
  2. satisfactory performance on written and oral examinations.
  3. completion of an acceptable dissertation.

I. Any student who fails to register for two consecutive long semesters before they begin enrolling in dissertation hours at UNT will be required to reapply for admission to the history doctoral program. Once a student has enrolled in dissertation hours, continuous enrollment in at least 3 dissertation hours each long semester is necessary to maintain eligibility in the program. Per University regulations, students have eight (8) calendar years from the date of their first graduate-level history course listed on their degree plan to complete the Ph.D. degree.

IV. Comprehensive (Qualifying) Examinations

A. A Ph.D. student who completes 30 hours of coursework and meets the language requirement is eligible to schedule and take the comprehensive examination--first the written, then the oral.

B. The Graduate Advisor in consultation with the Graduate Program Assistant and the major professor will be responsible for certifying the eligibility of the student to take the comprehensive examination by determining whether all requirements (language, seminars, courses, etc.) have been met.

C. Once eligible as defined above in IV. A and B, the student must schedule and successfully complete written and oral comps within one calendar year.

D. The student will work with their committee members and choose from a selection of three departmentally-set weeks each calendar year in which comprehensive examinations may take place. Once the examination period has been selected, the departmental Graduate Program Assistant will notify the faculty members representing the student's four examination areas to prepare and submit questions for the written portion of the examination.

E. All written comprehensive examinations will be administered in a room provided by the department. The examination will be scheduled over a period of four working days, one examination area per day. During the selected week, exams will take place between 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday thru Friday, with a one-day break on Wednesday.

  1. The student will prepare a schedule prepared by which to pick up the set of questions for one area per day, answer it, and return the examination and answers to the departmental Graduate Program Assistant, who will deliver them to the professor for grading. The student will follow this procedure until the schedule is complete.
  2. Each professor will grade the examination over their area and then will notify the Graduate Program Assistant in writing (preferably by e-mail) as to whether or not the student passed the faculty member's written examination. If the student passes all four written examinations, the oral portion of the exams commences.
  3. If the student receives a failing grade on any of the written examinations, the student's committee will determine whether the student will be dropped from the doctoral program or allowed to retake the examination(s) failed. The committee will also determine whether any additional formal coursework will be required and will set a date for the re-examination.
  4. Students who receive a failing grade on a written examination on their second attempt will be dropped from the program. Students failing a second examination may appeal to the Graduate Committee for a third and final attempt.

F. When the student has completed the written examinations to the satisfaction of those conducting them on either the first or second try, the major professor, in consultation with the advisory committee, will arrange the time and place for the oral examination, which will be administered no sooner than ten calendar days and no more than three calendar weeks after the last written examination. These time limitations may be revised by the unanimous consent of the student's advisory committee and the Graduate Advisor.

  1. The oral qualifying examination will cover the student's written answers in the four chosen examination areas as well as relevant coursework the student has had with each committee member, and the examining committee will be structured for this purpose.
  2. Upon completion of the oral examination, the student's committee will decide whether the performance was satisfactory or unsatisfactory. The committee will report its decision to the Department Chair, and this report will be made a part of the student's departmental file.
  3. All examiners should base their decision on the student's entire performance over the whole examination. Two or more negative votes will constitute an unsatisfactory rating. If the performance is unsatisfactory, the committee must decide whether the student shall terminate studies or do additional work. In the latter case, the committee will counsel the student about their future program. The committee will decide whether the student must complete all the qualifying examinations again or retake only a portion of them. These decisions will be included in the committee's report to the Department Chair.
  4. If the committee allows the student to retake the examination or a portion of it, the committee will repeat the same process of decision and report in writing to the Department Chair. If, in the opinion of the majority of the advisory committee, the student performs unsatisfactorily in any aspect of the second oral examination, the student will be dropped from the program. Students failing their second oral examination attempt may appeal to the Graduate Committee for a third and final try.

V. Approval of Dissertation Topic

A. The student's advisory committee will discuss and approve or reject the dissertation topic at the close of the successful oral examination. If the advisory committee rejects the dissertation topic, the student and the major professor will revise the dissertation proposal for resubmission to the committee as soon as possible.

B. Prior to the preliminary examinations, the major professor will add a required member from outside the department to the committee. This outside member will participate in the approval of the dissertation topic and will advise and participate in the evaluation of the dissertation as a scholarly and original work.

C. Though the outside member will not participate in the comprehensive examinations, he/she may attend the oral examination to give advice on the dissertation topic. If the outside member cannot be present at the approval of the dissertation topic meeting, the major professor will arrange for the outside member's approval or rejection of the dissertation topic as soon as possible after the proceedings.

VI. Approval of Dissertation

A. The major professor will direct the dissertation and the associated research; however, all members of the committee (including the outside member) will be equally responsible for its final approval.

B. The major professor shall keep all members of the committee informed on the progress of the dissertation and provide each member ample opportunity to read and evaluate the dissertation as it progresses to avoid major revisions of the completed dissertation.

C. The dissertation must be completed and approved by the student's committee within eight calendar years from the date that they enrolled in their first graduate-level history course listed on their degree plan to complete the Ph.D. degree.

D. Students must apply for graduation with Toulouse prior to scheduling their oral defense.

E. Upon completing the dissertation, the student will make a final oral defense over that completed research.

  1. The student in consultation with the major professor and the advisory committee will arrange the time and place for the final defense with the departmental program assistant. Before the defense, the major professor should check with the departmental Graduate Program Assistant to see if the graduate school's form to report the defense's result is in the student's file. This form is generated when the student files for graduation. The student and major professor should note the catalog date by which defense results must be reported [and the dissertation filed if applicable] if the student is to graduate in any particular semester. If the examination is taken [and the dissertation is filed] after that date but before the end of the semester, the student's degree will be conferred at the next commencement.
  2. All members of the student's advisory committee will be present at the defense, and any interested member of the Department of History may also attend. The committee will make its decision on the dissertation in a manner analogous to those on the comprehensive oral defense. Two or more negative votes will constitute non-acceptance of the dissertation. In that case, the advisory committee will decide whether the student should terminate studies or rewrite all or part of the dissertation. In the latter case, the committee will state in writing how it will determine whether those new requirements have been met.
  3. Upon successful completion of the oral dissertation defense, the committee will complete the proper report form and submit it to the departmental program assistant, who will then forward it to Toulouse Graduate School for certification that the student has satisfactorily completed all departmental requirements for the appropriate Ph.D. degree. The dissertation must also be submitted to Toulouse Graduate School for final approval by deadlines set forth in the Graduate catalog in the semester the student wishes to graduate (see Toulouse website for instructions, including final formatting).

VII. Department Policy on Maximum Hours of non-Dissertation Coursework and Grades of "Incomplete" on Graduate Courses

A. The department recognizes that sometimes it is necessary due to extenuating circumstances for students to take more than the required thirty credit hours of graduate coursework (exclusive of dissertation hours) in pursuit of their Ph.D. degree. It is still in the best interests of all parties involved (students, department, and university), however, to have students finish their Ph.D. degree in as timely a manner as possible. Towards this end, any student who wishes to take more than thirty-nine credit hours of graduate coursework (again, exclusive of dissertation hours) while pursuing his or her Ph.D. degree must get the approval of the departmental Graduate Committee (in writing) for these excess hours. In addition, the student should be aware that the eight-year university limit on obtaining the degree overrides all other considerations.

B. An Incomplete Grade ("I") is a non-punitive grade given only during the last one-fourth of a term/semester and only if a student (1) is passing the course and (2) has a justifiable reason (such as serious illness), for not completing the work on schedule. The student must arrange with the instructor to finish the course at a later date by completing specific requirements. These requirements must be entered on the grade roster by the instructor. Grades of I assigned to a graduate course at the end of the Fall 2017 semester and later will default to F after a period of one year unless the instructor has designated a different automatic grade.

C. Students who have 3 outstanding graduate-level grades of "Incomplete" on their transcript at any given time will not be allowed to register for further classes until at least one of the "Incompletes" is removed. Students may not sit for their comprehensive examinations or register for dissertation hours if they have any grades of "Incomplete" on their UNT graduate record.

VIII. General Statement of Departmental Philosophy and Appeals Procedures

A. All of the preceding departmental policies are meant to facilitate our doctoral students' completion of the Ph.D. degree in a timely manner and in a way that meets the needs of the student, the department, and the university.

B. With the above statement being a general framework, the department realizes that each student's path to the degree will be different and that any given student may encounter circumstances in their program of study that fall outside of departmental policies.

C. In recognition of the above stated fact, Ph.D. students who face extraordinary circumstances that make adherence to particular departmental policies problematic for them may appeal to the Graduate Committee for a waiver of the policy in question.

D. Such appeals must be made in writing to the Graduate Advisor or the Department Chair, who will then present the appeal to the Graduate Committee for discussion and a vote. Decisions on appeals of departmental policy made by the Graduate Committee are not meant to set precedent for future appeals of a similar nature by other students. Every reasonable effort will be made by the Committee to render decisions in a timely manner.

APPENDIX A - SPECIALTIES FOR THESES AND DISSERTATIONS

Full Members of University Graduate Faculty (with Department Category noted)

Beebe - Category 2

  • European Concentration: Medieval History, Digital Humanities
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: Culture and Everyday Life; ​Gender and Sexuality; Institutions, Networks, and Power; Religion and Belief; Science, Technology, and Medicine

Calderon - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Twentieth Century, Texas, Mexican American
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: Borderlands, Migration, and Diaspora; Labor and Political Economy; Memory and Representation; Politics and Policy; Race and Ethnicity
  • World History Examination Field: Latin America

Campbell - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Early National, Civil War and Reconstruction, Old South, Texas, Local
  • Military History Concentration: Texas Military History

Chet - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Colonial and Revolutionary, Early National, Military
  • European Concentration: 17th- and 18th-Century Europe, Military
  • Military History Concentration: Ancient Greece & Rome, 18th Century Europe, British Empire and Commonwealth, American Military Culture, British/Colonial America, Native American Warfare, American Revolution, Early US Military History to 1815, War and Society, The Military Revolution, Revolution and Insurgency
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: Borderlands, Migration, and Diaspora; Empire, Indigeneity, and (De)Colonization; Institutions, Networks, and Power; Politics and Policy; War, Society, and Martial Culture
  • World History Examination Field: Imperialism

Fuhrmann - Category 3

  • European Concentration: Ancient​, Classical Greece & Rome​
  • Military History Concentration: Ancient Greece & Rome​, War and Society​, War and Religion​
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: Environment; Institutions; Networks and Power; Politics and Policy; War, Society, and Martial Culture

Golden - Category 2

  • European Concentration: 17th- and 18th-Century Europe​, Early Modern France

Hilliard - Category 3

  • World History Examination Field: Africa​

Imy - Category 2

  • European Concentration: 19th-Century Europe, 20th-Century Europe​, Military​, Modern Britain, Women and Gender
  • Military History Concentration: British Empire and Commonwealth​, World War I​, Race and Wa​r, War and Society​, Gender and War, War and Religion, Culture of War
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: Borderlands, Migration, and Diaspora; Empire, Indigeneity, and (De)Colonization; Race and Ethnicity; Religion and Belief; War, Society, and Martial Culture
  • World History Examination Field: Imperialism

Leggiere - Category 3

  • European Concentration: 17th- and 18th-Century Europe, Revolutionary Europe, 19th-Century Europe, Military, Early Modern France, Modern France,
  • Military History Concentration: 18th Century Europe, 19th Century Europe, French Revolution & Napoleon, Modern Germany, Modern France, Race and War, War and Society, Culture of War, The Military Revolution, Military Theory and Strategic Thought

McCaslin - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Early National, Civil War and Reconstruction, Texas, Military
  • Military History Concentration: American Military Culture, US Civil War, Texas Military History​

Mendiola-Garcia - Category 3

  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Institutions, Networks, and Power; Labor and Political Economy
  • World History Examination Field: Latin America

Mendoza - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Civil War and Reconstruction, Late 19th- and Early 20th-Centur​y, Twentieth Centur​y, Texas, Military, Mexican American
  • Military History Concentration: World War II, American Military Culture, Early US Military History to 1815, US Civil War, 20th Century US Military History, Texas Military History, Race and War, War and Society, Culture of War
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: Race and Ethnicity; War, Society, and Martial Culture

Mierzejewski - Category 3

  • European Concentration: 19th-Century Europe, 20th-Century Europe, Military, Modern Germany, Economics & the Welfare State
  • Military History Concentration: 19th Century Europe, Modern Germany, Word War II, Cold War

Moran - Category 2

  • US History Concentration: ​Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Twentieth Century, Women and Gender
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Food and the Body; Gender and Sexuality; Labor and Political Economy; Politics and Policy; Science, Technology, and Medicine

Morris -Category 3

  • European Concentration: 17th- and 18th-Century Europe, Revolutionary Europe, 19th-Century Europe, 17th- and 18th-Century Britain, Women and Gender
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Gender and Sexuality; Institutions, Networks, and Power; Politics and Policy

Moye - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Twentieth Century, New South, African American
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Institutions, Networks, and Power; Memory and Representation; Politics and Policy; Race and Ethnicity

Pomerleau - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Twentieth Century, Women and Gender
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Environment; Gender and Sexuality; Memory and Representation; Religion and Belief

Seligmann - Category 2

  • US History Concentration: ​Colonial and Revolutionary
  • Military History Concentration: American Military Culture

Smith - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Colonial and Revolutionary, Early National, American West, Spanish and French Borderlands, Texas
  • Military History Concentration: Native American Warfare​
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​ Empire, Indigeneity, and (De)Colonization
  • World History Examination Field: Imperialism​

Stockdale - Category 3

  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Borderlands, Migration, and Diaspora; Empire, Indigeneity, and (De)Colonization; Gender and Sexuality; Institutions, Networks, and Power; Memory and Representation; Race and Ethnicity; Religion and Belief
  • World History Examination Field: Imperialism, Middle East

Tanner - Category 3

  • Military History Concentration: China and Far East, Revolution and Insurgency, Military Theory and Strategic Thought
  • World History Examination Field: Imperialism​, Modern China

Torget - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Early National, Civil War and Reconstruction, Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Old South, Spanish and French Borderlands, Texas
  • Military History Concentration: US Civil War​, Texas Military History
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Borderlands, Migration, and Diaspora; Institutions, Networks, and Power; Race and Ethnicity;
  • World History Examination Field: Latin America

Velikanova - Category 3

  • European Concentration: 19th-Century Europe​, 20th-Century Europe​, Russia
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Culture and Everyday Life; Memory and Representation; Religion and Belief

Wallach -Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Twentieth Century, New South, African American
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Culture and Everyday Life; Food and the Body; Memory and Representation; Race and Ethnicity

Wawro - Category 3

  • European Concentration: Revolutionary Europe​, 19th-Century Europe, 20th-Century Europe, Military, Early Modern France​, Modern Germany, Austria-Hungary and the Balkans​
  • Military History Concentration: 19th Century Europe​, Modern Germany, Modern France, British Empire and Commonwealth​, World War I, World War II, Cold War, 20th Century US Military History​, War and Society, Culture of War​, Revolution and Insurgency, Military Theory and Strategic Thought​

Wise - Category 3

  • US History Concentration: ​Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century, Twentieth Century, American West
  • Body, Place, Identity Concentration: ​Empire, Indigeneity, and (De)Colonization; Environment; Food and the Body; Memory and Representation; Science, Technology, and Medicine

Associate Members of the University Graduate Faculty (with Department Category noted)

Cox - 20th-century US, US Diplomacy, US in the World, War Crimes, Genocide, and Justice - Category 1

Mitchener - US since 1865, Naval - Category 1

Roberts - Late Roman Empire, Byzantine, Pre-1500 Mediterranean World - Category 1

Welch - 20th-century US, Great Depression/New Deal, Labor, Urbanization, Gilded Age, New South - Category 1

APPENDIX B

Graduate Study Concentrations with Areas for Comprehensive Exam Fields

(Effective Date Fall 2018)

The doctoral degree (Ph.D.) is offered in four general concentrations: (1) Europe, (2) United States, (3) Body, Place, and Identity, and (4) Military History. The Graduate Committee and Departmental Affairs Committee approve the following areas for graduate study in preparation for comprehensive exam fields.

Geographic Concentration: United States History Field

Chronological Areas

Colonial and Revolutionary

Early National

Civil War and Reconstruction

Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century

Twentieth Century

Topical Areas

Old South

New South

American West

Spanish and French Borderlands

Texas

Military

Women and Gender

African American

Mexican American

Local

Geographic Concentration: European History Field

Chronological Areas

Ancient

Medieval

Renaissance

Reformation

17th- & 18th-century

Revolutionary Europe

19th-century Europe

20th-century Europe

Topical Areas

Classical Greece and Rome

17th & 18th century Britain

Modern Britain

Early Modern France

Modern France

Modern Germany

Russia

Military

Women & Gender

Austria-Hungary and the Balkans

Economics and the Welfare State

Thematic Concentration: Military History Field

Areas

Ancient Greece & Rome

18th Century Europe

19th Century Europe

French Revolution & Napoleon

Modern Germany

Modern France

British Empire and Commonwealth

World War I

World War II

Cold War

American Military Culture

British/Colonial America

Native American Warfare

American Revolution

Early US Military History to 1815

US Civil War

20th Century US Military History

Texas Military History

China and Far East

Race and War

War and Society

Gender and War

War and Religion

Culture of War

The Military Revolution

Revolution and Insurgency

Military Theory and Strategic Thought

Thematic Concentration: Body, Place, and Identity Field

Areas

Borderlands, Migration, and Diaspora

Culture and Everyday Life

Empire, Indigeneity, and (De)Colonization

Environment

Food and the Body

Gender and Sexuality

Institutions, Networks, and Power

Labor and Political Economy

Memory and Representation

Politics and Policy

Race and Ethnicity

Religion and Belief

Science, Technology, and Medicine

War, Society, and Martial Culture

Geographic Areas in World History Field (Not a Concentration)

Africa

Latin America

Middle East

Modern China

Imperialism

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